FBI Report on Psychopaths

A few quotes from the article:

The term psychopathy refers to a personality disorder that includes a cluster of interpersonal, affective, lifestyle, and antisocial traits and behaviors.1 These involve deception; manipulation; irresponsibility; impulsivity; stimulation seeking; poor behavioral controls; shallow affect; lack of empathy, guilt, or remorse; sexual promiscuity; callous disregard for the rights of others; and unethical and antisocial behaviors.2

Psychopathy is the most dangerous of the personality disorders. To understand it, one must know some fundamental principles about personality. Individuals’ personalities represent who they are; they result from genetics and upbringing and reflect how persons view the world and think the world views them. Personalities dictate how people interact with others and how they cope with problems, both real and imagined. Individuals’ personalities develop and evolve until approximately their late 20s, after which they are well-hardwired in place, unable to be altered.

Many psychopaths have little difficulty joining the ranks of business, politics, law enforcement, government, and academia.10 They exist in all lines of work, from executive to blue-collar professions. However, psychopathy often is misread, misdiagnosed, minimized, or explained away by professionals whose jobs require regular interaction with psychopaths, namely in the mental health, judicial, and law enforcement communities. When these professionals encounter psychopathy in the course of their work, their reaction and response to the psychopath may be too little and too late. Their lack of information can lead to serious consequences, ranging from mishandling the strategy for interviews and interrogations to believing a psychopath’s complete fabrications as seemingly plausible explanations.

The reactions of psychopaths to the damage they inflict most likely will be cool indifference and a sense of power, pleasure, or smug satisfaction, rather than regret or concern. Most people closely associated with a psychopath may know something is wrong with that person, but have no idea as to the depth of the pathology. They frequently will blame themselves for all of the problems they have had with a psychopath, whether at work, in a relationship, or within a family. After interacting with psychopaths, most people are stunned by these individuals’ ruthlessness, callousness, and denial or minimization of the damage they have caused.

I think many of us can relate to the above paragraph…

You can read the entire article by clicking here:

www.fbi.gov

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3 Responses to FBI Report on Psychopaths

  1. shanakd9 says:

    My mother’s photo should be next to the definition of psychopath in the dictionary as an example of someone who is one.

  2. Little Nel says:

    I too, had the same experiences with a psychopath father. Cool indifference, a sense of power, pleasure, and smug satisfaction rather than regret or concern. He responded with a sardonic laugh, whenever he heard that someone was suffering or had something bad happen to them.

    It was hard to acknowledge his cruelty. I remember that I had a puppy when I was 3 or4. One day he picked it up and threw it against our backyard fence because he was angry at the neighbor. I never saw that puppy again.

  3. L.Day says:

    1. The reactions of psychopaths to the damage they inflict most likely will be cool indifference and a sense of power, pleasure, or smug satisfaction, rather than regret or concern.
    2. They frequently will blame themselves for all of the problems they have had with a psychopath, whether at work, in a relationship, or within a family.
    3.After interacting with psychopaths, most people are stunned by these individuals’ ruthlessness, callousness, and denial or minimization of the damage they have caused.

    1. The person who sexually assaulted me was a psychopath. I confronted him 25 years later and he had cool indifference, a sense of power, pleasure, & smug satisfaction. He had no regret or concern at all! He was an empty shell of a person or a robot.
    2. I blamed myself for a lot of the problems I had with this psychopath.
    3. I, too, was stunned by this rapist/psychopath’s denial or minimization of the damage he caused me. He felt that he had done nothing wrong and refused to apologize. I was stunned. I did finally get him to apologize but he would not say what the apology was for. He simply said, “I am sorry for everything.” I truly dislike psychopaths. My father was a psychopath as well.

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