Significant Films About Repressed Memory

Hollywood made very few films about repressed memory. I am posting about three excellent films in which Hollywood managed to do wonderful work with research, writing, and acting.

You can find these movies on Netflix or order from your local library.

Take care when watching, as they will probably trigger something in anyone who has had similar experiences, but then again, that would be good compass to any truth hiding inside you.

PT

The Prince of Tides

A New York psychiatrist treating an emotionally scarred woman finds it helpful to discuss her South Carolina family’s troubled history with the woman’s twin brother. He and the psychiatrist find themselves drawn together by their equally turbulent pasts, and they form an alliance which ultimately leads to romance.

DC

Dolores Claiborne

In a small New England town, Dolores Claiborne (Kathy Bates) works as a housekeeper for the rich but heartless Vera Donovan (Judy Parfitt). When Vera turns up dead, Dolores is accused of killing her elderly employer — so her estranged daughter, Selena (Jennifer Jason Leigh), a well-respected New York City journalist, decides to visit her mother and investigate the matter for herself. As Selena digs deeper into the case, she uncovers shocking truths about the murder and her own childhood.

TA

A Thousand Acres

A patriarch (Jason Robards) deeds his farm to two (Michelle Pfeiffer, Jessica Lange) of his three daughters in a modern “King Lear” set in the U.S. Midwest.

~Alethea

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One Response to Significant Films About Repressed Memory

  1. KevinF says:

    Thanks Alathea. These are excellent ‘family’ movies for holiday viewing and (unfortunately) they’re very representative and realistic for a large percentage of families

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